Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Tables covered in paper and then marked with crayons create a new interpretation of the wooden tables’ textural material. Here, Nendo borrows the udukuri technique which wears down the soft layers of the cypress wood, giving prominence to the harder grains. Paper is then laid over top before applying the color, resulting in subtle color and intricate line work.

Nendo: website via: Dezeen

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Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Nendo: Bird-Apartment

Creating the ultimate bird-lover’s experience, voyeurs can observe at the most intimate levels once inside Nendo’s human scale birdhouse. This symbiotic housing structure allows the birds to reside in a relatively natural environment, the forest, while the curious human unobtrusively peers inside. In a world where humans increasingly stray from interaction with the animals and nature on which we depend, Nendo’s Bird-Apartment diminishes the gap between man and these vital, natural, life elements.

From Nendo: A treehouse designed for the Ando Momofuku Center, a facility devoted to promoting and increasing access to nature activities. The facility is located in a forest in Komoro City in Japan’s mountainous Nagano Prefecture. Our treehouse is collective housing for many birds and one person. On one side, the treehouse has entrances to 78 nest spaces for birds. The other side has an entrance for one person, who can look into the birds’ nests from inside the treehouse.

Nendo: website via: Dezeen


Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Inhale

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Press

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Overflow

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Innerflow

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / X-Ray Vase

Using the unpredictable malleability of glass, Nendo works with Czech company Lasvit to create hand-blown unique lighting, table and tabletop designs. The medium allows the designs to be both wild and controlled, resulting in organically soft embellishments within an innately stiff, yet delicate, form.

From Lasvit: The new Nendo collection combines elegant lightness and minimalism to create practical, beautiful objects with evocative, delicate appeal. Because Lasvit’s glass blowers create each piece individually and because glass is a fluid, changeable medium, no two items are exactly alike. Each of the five concepts presented at Superstudio explores a different, distinctive approach to glass achieved by the accomplished artisans in the Lasvit workshop in Nový Bor. For Lasvit’s Inhale l, glass blowers form big air bubbles then inhale to produce an unusual shape with negative air pressure. X-Ray Vases capitalize on transparency and reflection, two key characteristics of glass, to transform a series of domes within a larger mirrored dome, into a subtle, ever-changing optical effect. Press lamps in pendant and floor styles rely on light sources tucked into compressed glass tubes to produce soft, organic forms. Innerblow and Overflow tables deploy two techniques using metal forms and the flowing quality of molten glass to create smooth and water-like surfaces.

Nendo: website  Lasvit: website


Nendo for Carpenters Workshop Gallery: Static Bubbles

Nendo for Carpenters Workshop Gallery: Static Bubbles

Nendo for Carpenters Workshop Gallery: Static Bubbles

Nendo for Carpenters Workshop Gallery: Static Bubbles

Using a  non-traditional design material, Nendo crafts lighting and tabletop bowls. Particularly interesting is the family effect that we see in these grouped portrayals. What has a somewhat pedestrian feel as a material becomes ethereal when gathered amongst itself and enhanced with light; the bulb choice adds to the other-worldly appearance. As tabletop pieces, these lightweight vessels take on a precious sculptural feel; contents to be chosen wisely.

From Nendo: A collection of sculptural objects made by heat-forming agricultural nets ordinarily placed around fruit and vegetables to prevent them from harm by wind and animals. The nets are stronger than organdy but more flexible than wire mesh. Using them as a sculptural material allowed us to evade the traditional necessity of combining structure with a separate surface material, to create a thin membrane that stands independently, but also floats gently on a breeze.

Nendo: website  Carpenters Workshop Gallery: website

Seen on: Dezeen


Trend & Inspiration by designgush: GRAPHIC LINE

Trend & Inspiration by designgush: Graphic Line

GRAPHIC LINE:  The line between different sectors of design blurs so that elements used in two-dimensional design enter the world of objects.  Line is not just decoration but actually becomes the form and that which gives the object shape and significance.  The pieces are fun, playful and clever.

1. David Grass, Not a Box

2. Autoban, Wired King

3. Portia Wells, Slipcover Chair

4. Daniel Martinez & Jérémy Murier, Cross Seating

5. Martín Azúa, Unión Suiza Vases

6. Alessandra Baldereschi for Skitsch, FildeFer

7. Nendo, Thin Black Lines

8. Nathan Yong, Drapery

9. Plumen, Designer Energy Saving Light Bulb

designgush is created by Jessica Smarsch


Nendo: Dancing Squares

Nendo: Dancing Squares

Nendo: Dancing Squares

Nendo: website

Seen on: Dezeen


Nendo: Thin Black Lines

Nendo: Thin Black Lines

Nendo: website

Seen on: Dezeen