Advertisements

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

The Kenny chair from Raw Edges plays with the ways of making a chair out of the most basic shapes and materials. Here they use a plain weave woven fabric from Kvadrat, metal mesh and upholstery foam to form the seat that perches atop the simple, oak, four-legged frame. Patterning is made by removing threads from the woven fabric, which also provides opportunities for structural change, most importantly at the sides of the chairs.

From Raw Edges: The warp and woof threads arrangement allowed the pair to unravel and release threads from within the woven fabric, creating a hollow sleeve inside its surface. The designers then placed two layers in different colours on top of each other and re-stitched them together using transparent plastic strip. As a result, a colourful rim had appeared from the other layer, reminiscent of the selvedge that can be found as the hem of raw fabrics. Usually only found decorating the edges of a textile while on the roll, the selvedge is generally cut from the fabric and not part of an end product. In this project Raw Edges is celebrating it, and have used the linear elements of the fabric to dictate the form of an armchair. The fabric is stretched to the structure of the armchair by these newfound “unravelling parts”.

Raw Edges: website Moroso: website via: Dezeen

Advertisements

Raw Edges for the British Council: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

From the British Council: British-based design studio Raw-Edges has been commissioned by the British Council to design a bespoke travelling bookcase to house one carefully selected work of fiction from each of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists. The bookcase will also hold editions of Granta magazine. The highly inventive design means the books themselves take centre stage in the installation. The interactive nature of the bookcase also allows visitors to change the display by repositioning the books. It invites visitors to delve into the stories and also consider the books’ physical qualities and design.

Raw Edges: website via: Dezeen


Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

Andreas Engesvik: Bunad Blankets

The Bunad Blankets from Andreas Engesvik draw on nostalgic craft to strengthen a cultural identity. Using references from traditional Norwegian clothing, the blankets relate to the modern aesthetic through their graphic patterning and use of saturated colors. In a world where national borders decreasingly constrain us and mobility amongst citizens is increasingly more common, designs that remind us of our heritage help to institute a sense of belonging to a homeland.

From Andreas Engesvik: The Bunad is a range of traditional Norwegian rural clothes and folk costumes with its roots dating from the 18th and 19th centuries. In Norway, it is common to wear bunad at various celebrations such as folk dances, weddings, and especially the May 17 National Day celebrations. The Bunad Blanket is a new product category that encompasses recognizable aspects from the bunad tradition. [It] represents a simplification and transferring of the Norwegian folk costumes [and] introduces this rich tradition into our daily environments and interiors.

Andreas Engesvik: website


Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Haworth: Shetland Rocking Stool

Showing off at Neocon 2012 last week in Chicago, Haworth’s Shetland Rocking Stool clearly communicates “Rocking Horse” even though its form exhibits almost none of the identifying parts. With a curved bottom and saddled top, the correlation is clear and made appropriate for adults. Designed as a means for quick meeting spots, the Shetland Rocking Stool combines streamlined modern lines with a slightly wild textile accents and provides a lighthearted moment for any environment.

Haworth: website


Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Patricia Urquiola for Coalesse: Hosu

Seen at NeoCon 2012 in Chicago this past week, Patricia Urquiola debuts her new Hosu design for Coalesse, which promotes the growing office trend of relaxation in the workplace as a means to improve employee performance. The seating features Urquiola’s original textile, Hexa, a matelassé honeycomb design with a soft and textural touch. With options for upright or feet-up positions, the relaxed style offers a welcoming element to the overall design making the seating a great option for office and home alike.

From Coalesse: As mobile work moves around, it often needs to spread out — at home, at universities, in hotel rooms, even in creative business environments. Hosu encourages spreading out. Designed by Patricia Urquiola, this unique work lounge creates a comforting personal space to relax and get things done. The single seat lounge can be ordered with convertible chaise foldout. The two-seat sofa brings two people together even if they are focused on different tasks. Hosu features convenient rear and side storage pockets and cord pass-through. Its unique textured fabric, also designed by Urquiola, is offered in five exclusive colors.

Patricia Urquiola: website  Coalesse: website


Katie Stout: Bump In Your Rug

Katie Stout: Bump In Your Rug

Katie Stout: Bump In Your Rug

Katie Stout: Bump In Your Rug

The Standard East Village in NY hosted Noho Design District’s “Scale” exhibit this weekend curated by Architzer, Cool Hunting and Dwell magazine. Katie Stout’s Bump In Your Rug design, seen here, uses the traditional braided rug as a material for her stool-incorporated throw rug. The playful combination incorporates decoration with functionality and comfort, all in one unique piece.

From Katie Stout: Bump In Your Rug serves as a functional illusion for the floor. An extruded wedge hybridizes rug and ottoman to create an interior landscape meant for seating, eating and story telling. Referencing New England craft and hypnotic spirals, Bump In Your Rug fuses tradition and trip in a practical piece for everyday use.

Katie Stout: website


Debra Folz: ICFF Collection 2012

Debra Folz: ICFF Collection 2012

Debra Folz: Score Storage 4 & 3 tier

Debra Folz: Score Storage 2 & 1 tier

Debra Folz: Score Storage 4 tier

Debra Folz: Score Storage detail

Debra Folz: Spiro Mirror

Debra Folz: Spiro Mirror

Debra Folz: Spiro Mirror

Debra Folz: Pleat Stool

Debra Folz: Strung Shelving

Debra Folz: Strung Shelving

Debra Folz: Askew Carpet

Debra Folz: Askew Shelves

Debra Folz: Askew Shelves

Debra Folz’s new furniture ensemble features an array of objects from storage and seating to rugs and carpets. With a unique perspective on construction, Folz incorporates textiles into many of her pieces either for structure, comfort or as symbolic decoration. She plays with form and challenges our standard expectations, as seen in her Askew Shelves and Carpet. Her modern aesthetic is complimented with bold yet understated pops of color. All pieces are made locally in New England and are currently on exhibit at ICFF in New York.

Debra Folz: website