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Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Fanny Dora for La Vague: Deadaleas

Designed at ECAL, the Deadaleas shelving system by Fanny Dora uses a rather straight-forward construction to create an optically intriguing illusion of complex components. As a family of parts, the various configurations are suitable to house a variety of household objects from books to plants to jewelry, as seen above. Each unit’s mysterious dimensions are both complemented and obscured when adorned by said object in a sculptural result that brings aesthetics to the forefront of functional design.

From La Vague: Deadaleas is a book holder and wall shelf. The meeting of wood and mirrored inox is a game of appearance and disappearance that influences the perception of the two objects.

Fanny Dora: website La Vague: website via La Revue du Design

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Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Inhale

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Press

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Overflow

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / Innerflow

Nendo for Lasvit: Still & Sparkling / X-Ray Vase

Using the unpredictable malleability of glass, Nendo works with Czech company Lasvit to create hand-blown unique lighting, table and tabletop designs. The medium allows the designs to be both wild and controlled, resulting in organically soft embellishments within an innately stiff, yet delicate, form.

From Lasvit: The new Nendo collection combines elegant lightness and minimalism to create practical, beautiful objects with evocative, delicate appeal. Because Lasvit’s glass blowers create each piece individually and because glass is a fluid, changeable medium, no two items are exactly alike. Each of the five concepts presented at Superstudio explores a different, distinctive approach to glass achieved by the accomplished artisans in the Lasvit workshop in Nový Bor. For Lasvit’s Inhale l, glass blowers form big air bubbles then inhale to produce an unusual shape with negative air pressure. X-Ray Vases capitalize on transparency and reflection, two key characteristics of glass, to transform a series of domes within a larger mirrored dome, into a subtle, ever-changing optical effect. Press lamps in pendant and floor styles rely on light sources tucked into compressed glass tubes to produce soft, organic forms. Innerblow and Overflow tables deploy two techniques using metal forms and the flowing quality of molten glass to create smooth and water-like surfaces.

Nendo: website  Lasvit: website


Lindsey Adelman: Stalactite Candelabra & The Shady Side Candlesticks

Lindsey Adelman: Stalactite Candelabra

Lindsey Adelman: Stalactite Candelabra

Lindsey Adelman: The Shady Side Candlesticks

Lindsey Adelman: The Shady Side Candlesticks

This week at Salone del Mobile, Lindsey Adelman presents her new designs, Stalactite CandelabraThe Shady Side candlesticks, at the Wallpaper* Handmade exhibit. An extension of her sculptural approach to lighting design, her new Stalactite Candelabra creates a seemingly fragile yet powerful spectacle, not unlike some of the most breath-taking ones experienced in nature. The Shady Side candlesticks’ more subtle approach echo the sensibility of the pendant. With both new designs, Adelman conveys the feeling of natural occurrences in a story-telling fashion through delicate details and intricate, organic forms. Wallpaper* Handmade’s exhibit is at the Brioni Showroom, Via del Gesu 2A, Milan.

Lindsey Adelman: website


Attico: Veneer

Attico: Veneer

Attico: Veneer

Attico: Veneer

Attico: Veneer

Attico: Veneer

Cristina Celestino and Matteo Bastoni of Attico will present their new Veneer wrapped vase collection at Salone Satellite Pavilion 22/24 | stand A30 in Milano. Their innovative technique utilizes a range of mediums creating an eclectic mix of natural and man-made components and aesthetics. In a mix of simple and elegant forms, their refined shapes enhance modern design with a unique perspective on material exploration.

From Attico: Industrial design quality and research skills applied to traditional materials generates a new project philosophy. Pure and honest volumes, sincere shapes blended with genuine materials, made in the best Italian districts. Collection of vases “Veneer” created with the wrapping technique: the vases are composed of layers of essences of wood, carbon, glass fibre and adhesive films directly wrapped on steel spindles and then polymerized in autoclave. The language of the stratified material is interpreted as an aesthetic value, the plot of a story made of lightness, texture and resistance that amplifies these diversities.

Thanks to Attico for their submission to designgush.

Attico: website


Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre: Porcelain Turkish Coffee Pots

Santimetre, a studio based in Ayvalık (Turkey), designs handmade objects largely focused in porcelain. Their unique Turkish Coffee Pots reference the traditional pot’s shape but add modern elements through the material and varied color choices. Using olive tree sprig handles, the pots combine the sensual features of fine porcelain with nature’s more haphazard and quirky features creating a playful object that reminds us of our connection to nature through that which nourishes us. The handles also question the state of a “finished” material in an end-product and, in this case, show that raw beauty can be relevant in modern design.

Santimetre: website


Phil Cuttance: Faceture

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Light Shades

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Light Shade

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Vases

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Vases

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Vases detail

Phil Cuttance: Faceture Side Table

Phil Cuttance’s Faceture series uses a unique development process, demonstrated in the video above, to create organically shaped forms with pixelated appearances. As either light shades, vases or side tables, the pieces’ modern constructions nod to our digital world’s perspective and straddle the line between art and design.

From Cuttance: The FACETURE series consists of handmade faceted vessels, light-shades and table. Each object is produced individually by casting a water-based resin into a simple handmade mould. The mould is then manually manipulated to create the each object’s form before each casting, making every piece utterly unique.

Phil Cuttance: website


Loris&Livia: Tipsy

Loris&Livia: Tipsy

Loris&Livia: Tipsy

Loris&Livia: Tipsy

Loris&Livia: Tipsy

Whimsical, and in most cases functional, the Tipsy glasses from Loris&Livia are a unique & playful commentary on the effects of alcohol as well as an experimentation on material manipulation. Perhaps he-who-loves-liquor-a-bit-too-much can curb his enthusiasm with a slightly less voluminous option? Just a sip for you, monsieur!

From Loris&Livia:  DesignMarketo invited us to make an intervention on the traditional Duralex Picardie Glass. They look a bit out of shape, a bit wrong, just like the world around you when you get tipsy! Reminders of the merry atmosphere in over-crowded bars, standing like happy cocktail lovers defying the laws of gravity, our glasses were put in a kiln at a very high temperature until reaching their melting point. The process resulted in a slow deformation of the pieces while preserving their original identity. You can buy Tipsy from LORIS&LIVIA’s Boutique. Photographs by James Champion © 2011

Loris&Livia: website  DesignMarketo: website