Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

The Kenny chair from Raw Edges plays with the ways of making a chair out of the most basic shapes and materials. Here they use a plain weave woven fabric from Kvadrat, metal mesh and upholstery foam to form the seat that perches atop the simple, oak, four-legged frame. Patterning is made by removing threads from the woven fabric, which also provides opportunities for structural change, most importantly at the sides of the chairs.

From Raw Edges: The warp and woof threads arrangement allowed the pair to unravel and release threads from within the woven fabric, creating a hollow sleeve inside its surface. The designers then placed two layers in different colours on top of each other and re-stitched them together using transparent plastic strip. As a result, a colourful rim had appeared from the other layer, reminiscent of the selvedge that can be found as the hem of raw fabrics. Usually only found decorating the edges of a textile while on the roll, the selvedge is generally cut from the fabric and not part of an end product. In this project Raw Edges is celebrating it, and have used the linear elements of the fabric to dictate the form of an armchair. The fabric is stretched to the structure of the armchair by these newfound “unravelling parts”.

Raw Edges: website Moroso: website via: Dezeen

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Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

Studio Makkink and Bey for PROOFF: #006 SideSeat

From PROOFF: PROOFF #006 SideSeat has been designed to present a solution to the blending of work and leisure, public and private. How do you provide an environment which allows for changes in work focus and accommodates a full capacity workforce at the same time? How do you ensure that your visitor is free to decide how he spends his waiting time? PROOFF #006 SideSeat provides a solution: a self-contained desk, cupboard and chair which moves with you. It not only encourages users to be interactive and flexible with their working space, but creates privacy in an otherwise public area as well.

Studio Makkink and Bey: website PROOFF: website via: Dezeen


Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection and Il Treno

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection and Il Treno

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection and Il Treno

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

Tjep: Hendricks Collection

From Tjep: Hendrick’s Collection is a contemporary furniture range inspired by the trappings of bygone days and pays homage to the 17th century paintings of Hendrick Avercamp, an artist who devoted his life entirely to the portrayal of Dutch winter scenes. Nostalgia and modern aesthetics, a juxtaposition of old and new, brought together in solidly handcrafted Ash or Oak wood and finished to perfection.

Tjep: website via: Dezeen


Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

From Itay Ohaly: The Group Project is a non-linear design method – a disconnected collaboration between individual designers. A ‘group project’ starts with a selection of objects that are to be designed. Each one of these objects is divided and broken into smaller parts. All parts are designed according to a specific theme; however, each part is designed by a different designer without communicating with the other designers. When the parts’ design phase is finished, the group meets to perform minor necessary adjustments. Afterwards, all parts are produced and assembled. This kind of method composes a group exhibition within a single object. Each designer’s different approach and style are expressed together in one object, establishing a dialogue between the object’s different parts.

Dana Cannam – chair leg
Joon Han Lee – chair seat
Agata Karolina – chair back

Christian Fiebig – table leg
Amelia Desnoyers – table top
Eugenia Morpurgo – table drawer

Nati Moskovich – lamp base
Naama Bergman – lampshade
Itay Ohaly – lamp leg

Itay Ohaly: website via Dezeen


Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Small Dowood Lamps

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Large Dowood Lamps

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Large Dowood Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Small Dowood Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Diabolo Ceiling Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Diabolo Table Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Caracas Chair

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Caracas Chair

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Faces Standing Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Faces Standing Lamp

Colonel: Collection No. 2

Colonel: Collection No. 2 / Pondy Table & Bench

From Colonel: This new collection as the first collection of Colonel was inspired by outdoor furniture (beach, camping) aesthetics. It is a contemporary re-reading of this universe mixing colours, rhythms and patterns. It is mainly composed of wood, textile materials and surprising colors. The collection evokes summer, relaxation.

Colonel: website via: Dezeen


Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series

Chris Palmer: Loft Series / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series detail

Chris Palmer: Loft Series detail / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer: Loft Series detail

Chris Palmer: Loft Series detail / Photography Stephen Rinaldi

Chris Palmer creates a body of work that speaks to the rich history of the city in which he lives and works. The memory of Detroit’s industrial glory echoes its hum in Palmer’s Loft Series, both through its reclaimed materials and its Industrial Age style of manufacturing. Its rugged and hand-crafted styling pays homage to a past period whose values remain relevant in today’s search for a new future.

From Chris Palmer: The Loft Series is manufactured similar to turn of the century vehicles, carriages and other objects of that time. Combinations of wood, steel and solid rivets are not only reliably strong but offer a one-hundred-year-old industrial aesthetic. As a further exploration a third, more domestic material was added; seagrass has a pleasant aroma, interesting visual qualities and is reliably strong. This series is photographed at the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant in Detroit, Michigan, the building where the Ford Model T was made from 1904- 1910.

Thanks to Chris for his submission to designgush.

Chris Palmer: website


Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair

Adrien Rovero for Mountain Climbers: Rock Garden Chair (before transformation)

Adrien Rovero’s Rock Garden Chair is one interpretation of 40 that the Mountain Climbers project has commissioned for a charity project to benefit Switzerland’s Make-A-Wish foundation, as described by Mountain Climbers below. Rovero’s design turns a re-purposed cable car into a rocking chair of sorts as a way of simulating the natural rocking sensation that ski gondolas produce.

From Mountain Climbers: Mountain Climbers: Revisiting a Swiss Icon is an entrepreneurial project that is 100% Swiss, cultural, and ambitious, and which follows a logic of sustainable development and recycling for a charitable outcome. It consists of re-purposing 40 ski cable cars which will be dismantled and then given to 40 Swiss artists, architects and designers, ones that are considered to be rising stars in their fields. These participants will work for free; they will receive a budget in order to cover the cost of materials necessary to create their projects. The cars, once transformed, will go on exposition around Switzerland, then will be sold through auction by Christie’s to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Switzerland, which makes dreams come true for sick Swiss children. (Translated by dg)

Adrien Rovero: website Mountain Climbers: website via: MoCo Loco