Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter’s new Blocks project is part of a self-coined craft movement called Open Craft, enabling individuals the freedom to create a range of products through low-tech, basic materials and processes. His mold system allows for an endless combination of shape-forming resulting in countless end-uses, as demonstrated above. Open Craft becomes a way to involve the user in the design process, a process which reveals itself in its end appearance and bears evidence of the designer-user collaboration.

From Jurrijn Huffenreuter: The form language of the products is a clear result of the mold system. Every product is a reproducible unique piece. The imperfections of the mold parts remain visible in the finished product. This makes it a clear, readable product, showing the moment of creation. If the creator would like to make an object again he only has to stack the blocks around the object to recreate the mold.

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: website via MoCo Loco

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Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp & Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

From Dennis Parren: After the result of the CMYK lamp, the idea came to also make a CMYK bulb. Which is easier to produce and you find yourself more in mainstream of lighting. That makes it many times more accessible. It’s the first light bulb that creates colored shadows which also can be very wonderful with existing shades.

Dennis Parren: website via: Dezeen


Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

 

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Indian designer Nishi Chauhan’s visit to the craft district Channapatna outside of Bangalore inspired a new use for glass bottles, upcycling them into playful toys and lighting objects. Through employing the toy craftsmen of Channapatna, new dialogues began involving material use, design intent, and the use of their craft towards a wider world view.

From Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm is part of a continuing series of explorations centered around the twin themes of craft revival and the repurposing of used objects. This first set of upcycled bottle lamps visualize six animal forms featuring the wood and lac turnery craft of Channapatna in Karnataka, India. With minimal intervention from the designer and the craftsman, objects that would otherwise have met uninteresting ends in the recycling chain have been born again as playful, usable products.

Nishi Chauhan: website


TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

TROPE Candles: Capsule Collection

From electronics to toys and everything in between, the Capsule Collection from TROPE Candles speaks to the plethora of objects in this world that we make and throw away. While discarded, unwanted objects are typically hidden from sight in garbage bins and landfills, the experience of the Capsule candles burning away reminds us of this destruction, exposing the frivolous consumer lifestyle to which we’ve become accustomed.

From TROPE Candles: TROPE Candles are limited edition handmade candles. Every candle is the original detail of the interior, creating an association, prompting the interpretation of the form. TROPE Candles are clever metaphor about idea of destruction daily things. TROPE Capsule collection inspired by familiar and bright symbols of mass culture. TROPE Candles crafted, following the highest standarts of materials and quality of the finished production.

TROPE Candles: website & facebook page


François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc: Milord

François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc: Milord

François Clerc for Made In Design: Milord

François Clerc’s Milord functions as a mirror and comments on the face we show to the world. Is the reflection others see the true reflection of ourselves and how much knowledge of a person do we truly gain from outer appearances? By exposing the mirror’s empty inner form, Milord suggests that our outer images are only a thin layer of what truly lies within.

From François Clerc: Here is Milord, a freestanding mirror with a multifaceted form. Milord is a real dandy reflecting all around but for once we can see what lies behind the mirror, the empty shell. With this project I wanted to underline the fragility of our reflected image, the frailty of our appearance. I wanted to show what’s behind the mirror, the empty shell.

Made of stainless steel.
W 24 cm x D 25 cm x H 46 cm

Thanks to François for his submission to designgush.

François Clerc: website  Made in Design: website


Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup’s Bao Toaster, previously submitted as renderings, are now realized in a physical prototype form. Designers describe the concept below.

From Studio Bup: For many people, toasters are an essential appliance and a part of their daily routines. However, with most modern toasters, the human interaction is lost. Bao aims to bring back the quiet experience of breakfast, affording the opportunity for people to slow down and reconnect with the way in which they make their food. By making the toaster more transparent, users are able to understand exactly what is happening to their bread. Taking cues from traditional “baby-sit” toasters from the 1930’s, users toast one side at a time. Not only is this a unique way of interacting with the appliance, it also brings the toast farther away from the element, reducing the chances of burnt fingers. A cork timer cuts the power after a specified time so even forgetful users can safely use Bao.

Bup Studio: website


YOYO Studio: Puxxle

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Swiss Collection- St. Bernard

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Swiss Collection- Cow

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Swiss Collection – Gnome

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Tribute Collection – Frida

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Tribute Collection – Andy

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Animals & Plants Collection – Flamingo

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Animals & Plants Collection – Penguin

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Animals & Plants Collection – Owl

YOYO Studio: Puxxle Animal & Plants Collections – Owl Pieces

Combining children’s toys (puzzles) with those of adults (computer pixels), Portuguese designers Catarina and Luisa Lente of Barcelona-based YOYO studio create Puxxle: large scale pixelated graphics depicting playful characters for decorative functions. Appropriate for all ages, Puxxle references our modern world’s makeup through an age-old means of entertainment.

From YOYO Studio: Imagine what it would be like to take a bath with a shark, to have a cactus that doesn’t sting or to laughingly reach into an alligator’s mouth. Pixel by pixel, you can create, let grow and have your dream come true. The puxxle makes everything possible.

Thanks to YOYO Studio for their submission to designgush.

YOYO Studio / Puxxle: website