Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter’s new Blocks project is part of a self-coined craft movement called Open Craft, enabling individuals the freedom to create a range of products through low-tech, basic materials and processes. His mold system allows for an endless combination of shape-forming resulting in countless end-uses, as demonstrated above. Open Craft becomes a way to involve the user in the design process, a process which reveals itself in its end appearance and bears evidence of the designer-user collaboration.

From Jurrijn Huffenreuter: The form language of the products is a clear result of the mold system. Every product is a reproducible unique piece. The imperfections of the mold parts remain visible in the finished product. This makes it a clear, readable product, showing the moment of creation. If the creator would like to make an object again he only has to stack the blocks around the object to recreate the mold.

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: website via MoCo Loco

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Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Tables covered in paper and then marked with crayons create a new interpretation of the wooden tables’ textural material. Here, Nendo borrows the udukuri technique which wears down the soft layers of the cypress wood, giving prominence to the harder grains. Paper is then laid over top before applying the color, resulting in subtle color and intricate line work.

Nendo: website via: Dezeen


Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Using a dynamo (electricity generator), these lightweight objects capture kinetic energy and transfer it to LED lights. The brightness of the lights are proportional to the objects’ velocities. Dr. Margot Krasojevic describes the science behind her designs below.

From Dr. Margot Krasojevic:
Momentum Light – A light which produces an electrical current as a result of it’s kinetic energy. The 3d printed nylon polymer light is suspended by a spindle whereby its weight and form contribute to the angular momentum vector as it spins along its axis of rotation; it is affected by minor environmental changes such as temperature and air currents which rotate the light along its path of velocity. The light has a motion sensor diode clamped between both suspended 3d printed sections which powers the battery lighting the LED when in motion. As a result of its form the light speeds up tremendously due to its conservation of angular momentum, the form of the light reduces its rotational inertia affecting its rotational speed which must increase to maintain constant angular momentum resulting in a brighter light. The light has been influenced by the physics behind ice skater spinning/a spinning top.

Air Turbine Light: This 3d printed light acts as a vertical axis wind turbine. The form of the light uses the properties of aerodynamics to behave like a wind propeller, in principal the design is inspired by the Ropatec wind rotor. The ceramic body of the light is attached to a vertical axis which turns a diode rotor that transforms the movement into light. This 3d printed shell traps wind which rotates the axis in turn generating and transforming energy into light.

Thanks to Dr. Margot Krasojevic for her submission to designgush.

website & contact: margot@decodeine.org


Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

 

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm

Indian designer Nishi Chauhan’s visit to the craft district Channapatna outside of Bangalore inspired a new use for glass bottles, upcycling them into playful toys and lighting objects. Through employing the toy craftsmen of Channapatna, new dialogues began involving material use, design intent, and the use of their craft towards a wider world view.

From Nishi Chauhan: Animal Farm is part of a continuing series of explorations centered around the twin themes of craft revival and the repurposing of used objects. This first set of upcycled bottle lamps visualize six animal forms featuring the wood and lac turnery craft of Channapatna in Karnataka, India. With minimal intervention from the designer and the craftsman, objects that would otherwise have met uninteresting ends in the recycling chain have been born again as playful, usable products.

Nishi Chauhan: website


Studio Daniel: Vederlicht (Featherlight)

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

Studio Daniel: Vederlicht

The dictionary defines “light” in the physical sense as a noun: the natural agent that stimulates sight and makes things visible, a verb: to provide with light or lighting; illuminate and finally as an adjective: of little weight; easy to lift. Studio Daniel’s Vederlicht achieves all three of these definitions using lightweight materials to provide a structure for illumination. Vederlicht houses that which has no borders and gives form to the intangible.

From Studio Daniel: Vederlicht is a fascination that I had when I was a small child, the fascination of model glider plane. Back then these planes cost too much for me to buy and I only could look at them in the shop. The small kid in me is still there so i took the technique and material for making a glider and used it to design a lighting. The material used in this design is Balsa wood and Oracover which is used to cover the wings of a glider and gives the lamp altogether it’s ultra lightweight.

Thanks to Daniel Hulsbergen of Studio Daniel for his submission to designgush.

Studio Daniel: website


Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup: Bao Toaster

Studio Bup’s Bao Toaster, previously submitted as renderings, are now realized in a physical prototype form. Designers describe the concept below.

From Studio Bup: For many people, toasters are an essential appliance and a part of their daily routines. However, with most modern toasters, the human interaction is lost. Bao aims to bring back the quiet experience of breakfast, affording the opportunity for people to slow down and reconnect with the way in which they make their food. By making the toaster more transparent, users are able to understand exactly what is happening to their bread. Taking cues from traditional “baby-sit” toasters from the 1930’s, users toast one side at a time. Not only is this a unique way of interacting with the appliance, it also brings the toast farther away from the element, reducing the chances of burnt fingers. A cork timer cuts the power after a specified time so even forgetful users can safely use Bao.

Bup Studio: website


Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguinñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Tanya Aguiñiga: Rope Lights

Lighting, textiles and sculpture come together in Tanya Aguiñiga’s organically composed wall installations. Adaptable to endless configurations on or off the wall, the pieces integrate traditional crochet craft technique with an artist’s approach to design. The drama of Aguiñiga’s Rope Lights increases with number as they come alive in choreographed compositions.

From Tanya Aguiñiga: These compact fluorescent lights are covered in hand-knitted 100% cotton rope that is custom made in Los Angeles. They are made to order by the foot and are modular. They live in a space between minimalist light art and 1970’s crochet while paying homage to the ubiquitous office space lighting.

Tanya Aguiñiga: website