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Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

Raw Edges for Moroso: Kenny

The Kenny chair from Raw Edges plays with the ways of making a chair out of the most basic shapes and materials. Here they use a plain weave woven fabric from Kvadrat, metal mesh and upholstery foam to form the seat that perches atop the simple, oak, four-legged frame. Patterning is made by removing threads from the woven fabric, which also provides opportunities for structural change, most importantly at the sides of the chairs.

From Raw Edges: The warp and woof threads arrangement allowed the pair to unravel and release threads from within the woven fabric, creating a hollow sleeve inside its surface. The designers then placed two layers in different colours on top of each other and re-stitched them together using transparent plastic strip. As a result, a colourful rim had appeared from the other layer, reminiscent of the selvedge that can be found as the hem of raw fabrics. Usually only found decorating the edges of a textile while on the roll, the selvedge is generally cut from the fabric and not part of an end product. In this project Raw Edges is celebrating it, and have used the linear elements of the fabric to dictate the form of an armchair. The fabric is stretched to the structure of the armchair by these newfound “unravelling parts”.

Raw Edges: website Moroso: website via: Dezeen

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Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: Blocks

Jurrijn Huffenreuter’s new Blocks project is part of a self-coined craft movement called Open Craft, enabling individuals the freedom to create a range of products through low-tech, basic materials and processes. His mold system allows for an endless combination of shape-forming resulting in countless end-uses, as demonstrated above. Open Craft becomes a way to involve the user in the design process, a process which reveals itself in its end appearance and bears evidence of the designer-user collaboration.

From Jurrijn Huffenreuter: The form language of the products is a clear result of the mold system. Every product is a reproducible unique piece. The imperfections of the mold parts remain visible in the finished product. This makes it a clear, readable product, showing the moment of creation. If the creator would like to make an object again he only has to stack the blocks around the object to recreate the mold.

Jurrijn Huffenreuter: website via MoCo Loco


Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Nendo: Colored Pencil Table

Tables covered in paper and then marked with crayons create a new interpretation of the wooden tables’ textural material. Here, Nendo borrows the udukuri technique which wears down the soft layers of the cypress wood, giving prominence to the harder grains. Paper is then laid over top before applying the color, resulting in subtle color and intricate line work.

Nendo: website via: Dezeen


Raw Edges for the British Council: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

Raw Edges: Bloom

From the British Council: British-based design studio Raw-Edges has been commissioned by the British Council to design a bespoke travelling bookcase to house one carefully selected work of fiction from each of Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists. The bookcase will also hold editions of Granta magazine. The highly inventive design means the books themselves take centre stage in the installation. The interactive nature of the bookcase also allows visitors to change the display by repositioning the books. It invites visitors to delve into the stories and also consider the books’ physical qualities and design.

Raw Edges: website via: Dezeen


Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

Itay Ohaly: Group Project

From Itay Ohaly: The Group Project is a non-linear design method – a disconnected collaboration between individual designers. A ‘group project’ starts with a selection of objects that are to be designed. Each one of these objects is divided and broken into smaller parts. All parts are designed according to a specific theme; however, each part is designed by a different designer without communicating with the other designers. When the parts’ design phase is finished, the group meets to perform minor necessary adjustments. Afterwards, all parts are produced and assembled. This kind of method composes a group exhibition within a single object. Each designer’s different approach and style are expressed together in one object, establishing a dialogue between the object’s different parts.

Dana Cannam – chair leg
Joon Han Lee – chair seat
Agata Karolina – chair back

Christian Fiebig – table leg
Amelia Desnoyers – table top
Eugenia Morpurgo – table drawer

Nati Moskovich – lamp base
Naama Bergman – lampshade
Itay Ohaly – lamp leg

Itay Ohaly: website via Dezeen


Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp & Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Lamp

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

Dennis Parren: CMYK Bulb

From Dennis Parren: After the result of the CMYK lamp, the idea came to also make a CMYK bulb. Which is easier to produce and you find yourself more in mainstream of lighting. That makes it many times more accessible. It’s the first light bulb that creates colored shadows which also can be very wonderful with existing shades.

Dennis Parren: website via: Dezeen


Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Momentum Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Dr. Margot Krasojevic: Air Turbine Light

Using a dynamo (electricity generator), these lightweight objects capture kinetic energy and transfer it to LED lights. The brightness of the lights are proportional to the objects’ velocities. Dr. Margot Krasojevic describes the science behind her designs below.

From Dr. Margot Krasojevic:
Momentum Light – A light which produces an electrical current as a result of it’s kinetic energy. The 3d printed nylon polymer light is suspended by a spindle whereby its weight and form contribute to the angular momentum vector as it spins along its axis of rotation; it is affected by minor environmental changes such as temperature and air currents which rotate the light along its path of velocity. The light has a motion sensor diode clamped between both suspended 3d printed sections which powers the battery lighting the LED when in motion. As a result of its form the light speeds up tremendously due to its conservation of angular momentum, the form of the light reduces its rotational inertia affecting its rotational speed which must increase to maintain constant angular momentum resulting in a brighter light. The light has been influenced by the physics behind ice skater spinning/a spinning top.

Air Turbine Light: This 3d printed light acts as a vertical axis wind turbine. The form of the light uses the properties of aerodynamics to behave like a wind propeller, in principal the design is inspired by the Ropatec wind rotor. The ceramic body of the light is attached to a vertical axis which turns a diode rotor that transforms the movement into light. This 3d printed shell traps wind which rotates the axis in turn generating and transforming energy into light.

Thanks to Dr. Margot Krasojevic for her submission to designgush.

website & contact: margot@decodeine.org